Betrayed: The Truth About Brexit

Betrayed: The Truth About Brexit

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In Betrayed: The Truth About Brexit, Byline TV explores the deep, long term factors that led to Brexit, going further back than just the 2016 referendum, how both campaigns played a role, the chaos Brexit has unleashed since then and why the people who voted for it now feel betrayed by the very people they chose to follow in 2016.

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4 comments

  1. Sally Bourliakas says:

    Great film
    My parents are from Rotherham and Sheffield but myself and brother and sister were brought up in Grimsby.
    So the part about the decline of the fishing industry there rang true.
    The lack of hope after th decline following the cod wars with Island and then the further decline under th depression in the North during Thatchers despotic reign pushing personal greed and wrecking socialism in UK left a throvingarea a shadow of itself former self ripe for the lies of Brexit.
    Austin Mitchell had been everywhere in Grimsby regarded as a good egg but austerity was blamed on local Labour not on national Conservatives so The red wall fell in North Lincolnshire as well as them voting for Brexit.
    They see now it was all lies both Brexit and Levelling up.
    Hope doubly crushed.
    I left Lincolnshire in 1985 never to return.. after 3 years Uni in Oxford I spent 10 years enjoying my EU membership working abroad seasonally in French Alps and Greek Islands.
    Saving enough to settle down with my greek husband who’s partnered up with on the second year of my travels after a summer working in Spain then Winter in France and summer in Skiathos.
    We moved to Oxfordshire as my parents had left Grimsby to build some small businesses in A village in North Northumberland and as work there was seasonal too we didn’t settle there.
    Getting temp jobs in Oxfordshire and renting while buying a house in Grimsby to move to when jobs materialised but they never did.
    There were no science jobs there. We sold the beautiful four bed house backing onto a field n Grimsby for a three bed box twice the price in Bicester the only town we could afford in Oxfordshire and have lived here ever since 1997.
    My husband became a British Citizen in 1998 and daughter was born here in Oxford.
    We both voted to remain and would all vote to rejoin if given the chance.
    Bicester is part of the Cherwell constituency of the Attorney General Victoria Prentice but we will have our own constituency with Woodstock and Kidlington in the next General election.
    Our neighbours were mostly Brexit voters and conservatives but over last 8 years dissatisfied and let down they have in local elections turned to Liberal Democrats and voted tactically to GTTO as they only can defeat the Conservatives here not Labour who I’d always voted for previously.
    I went on marches in 2016 and before 2017 and 2019 Brexit decisions for Remain and exit from Brexit refinding my campaigning spirit from the 80’s campaigning for Peace/CND/an end to apartheid/support for PLO.
    I loved the freedom I had to work in EU and was only disappointed in that my years in EU paying taxes there didn’t count towards a pension in UK as I’d imagined before setting off for a decade of EU working.
    Luckily my daughter was christened in Greece and so both my husband and daughter have greek ID cards and can still travel freely unlike myself.

    I am so pleased this film got made it speaks to so many’s experiences and it was nostalgic to remember the boom weekends when as a teen I baby sat for returning trawlermen and made money for another months fun discos/sci fi novels/sweets till the next catch came in..
    A happy village life with freedom to rome leading to a funded Uni place and EU travelling and work for a decade..

    A far cry from broken Britain after austerity and Brexit that faces my daughter now finished with Uni and paying off debts from four years in Exeter… doing little local jobs as no Astrophysics ones yet…

    I would rejoin the EU in a heartbeat
    and may swap Britain for France in retirement if we don’t do that in time…
    But for now disabled by long covid for four years just getting back to my 20 year career in Hydrology, geochemistry lab work and applications engineer work would be nice…
    We need to rejoin the EU clean up our rivers and indoor air and renationalise utilities when we have gotten PR and rid of the Tories.
    Thank you for a thought provoking and truthful look at Brexit lies and reality.

  2. Christopher Kelly says:

    It’s a very good documentary but I don’t think it really explains the “deep, long term factors that led to Brexit”. The Euro-sceptics had been around since early 90s if not before. The Tories were even offering a referendum on EU membership in their 2005 manifesto. UKIP was around too, but getting nowhere electorally until seismic 2014 European Election result. How did that happen? How did they go from (2006) “fruitcakes and loonies” to winning majority of MEPs and changing the Tory party forever in the process? Crazy. In my view, the real long term factors were:
    1. right-wing media especially tabloids persistently hostile to EU and the ‘freedoms’
    2. complete lack of positive messaging about the EU, ever.
    As to why that anti-EU stance came to appeal to so many Brits (who now feel betrayed):
    3. widespread ignorance about structure and functioning of EU.
    4. widespread ignorance and naivety about politics and the machinations.
    5. underlying chauvinistic arrogance and xenophobia.

  3. J A Holt says:

    I agree wholeheartedly with the above comment. But I, too, have a quibble. Peter Oborne at 47’52” states: “he (Johnson) started to fall in with the most dreadful people,” but gives no clue to whom he is referring. Considering the loathsome creature Johnson became during his premiership, this seems to me to beg the question. In the absence of names, my guess is those he met at Lebedev’s Italian villa in April, 2018; the secrecy and mystery around that visit remain intact today. What horrors did Johnson face?
    If my guess is wrong, I have to assume Mr Oborne is referring to the ‘usual suspects’ at the time of brexit. Yes, I suppose they were dreadful enough.

  4. Anamaria Wills says:

    I think this is a brilliant film, absolutely illustrating and explaining why I, as a Remainer, feel as I do – and, in watching it, I began to empathise with the people who voted Leave – a situation I’d have said was impossible to empathise with! At the beginning, I was almost embarrassed to say the reason I want to Remain is because I am a European. I love that I have European heritage, that Moliere and Racine enrich me as much as Shakespeare (well, almost!) and Austen; that the glory that is Siena is as much mine as vitality of Liverpool or the inspiration of Oxford – that the breadth of vision that is Europe informs my thinking more completely than the UK alone. I miss it and I hurt, even 7 years later –
    So yes, it was terrific in showing the different types of damage and hurt and hopeful in ending with a sense that maybe things could change again – Bravo!
    My only quibble is that your very last sentences felt wrong, inadequate to what you’d taken on – it was a bit too vague, too ‘pie in the sky’ – What were you aiming for? It must be more than a history lesson, mustn’t it?

Leave a Reply

4 comments

  1. Sally Bourliakas says:

    Great film
    My parents are from Rotherham and Sheffield but myself and brother and sister were brought up in Grimsby.
    So the part about the decline of the fishing industry there rang true.
    The lack of hope after th decline following the cod wars with Island and then the further decline under th depression in the North during Thatchers despotic reign pushing personal greed and wrecking socialism in UK left a throvingarea a shadow of itself former self ripe for the lies of Brexit.
    Austin Mitchell had been everywhere in Grimsby regarded as a good egg but austerity was blamed on local Labour not on national Conservatives so The red wall fell in North Lincolnshire as well as them voting for Brexit.
    They see now it was all lies both Brexit and Levelling up.
    Hope doubly crushed.
    I left Lincolnshire in 1985 never to return.. after 3 years Uni in Oxford I spent 10 years enjoying my EU membership working abroad seasonally in French Alps and Greek Islands.
    Saving enough to settle down with my greek husband who’s partnered up with on the second year of my travels after a summer working in Spain then Winter in France and summer in Skiathos.
    We moved to Oxfordshire as my parents had left Grimsby to build some small businesses in A village in North Northumberland and as work there was seasonal too we didn’t settle there.
    Getting temp jobs in Oxfordshire and renting while buying a house in Grimsby to move to when jobs materialised but they never did.
    There were no science jobs there. We sold the beautiful four bed house backing onto a field n Grimsby for a three bed box twice the price in Bicester the only town we could afford in Oxfordshire and have lived here ever since 1997.
    My husband became a British Citizen in 1998 and daughter was born here in Oxford.
    We both voted to remain and would all vote to rejoin if given the chance.
    Bicester is part of the Cherwell constituency of the Attorney General Victoria Prentice but we will have our own constituency with Woodstock and Kidlington in the next General election.
    Our neighbours were mostly Brexit voters and conservatives but over last 8 years dissatisfied and let down they have in local elections turned to Liberal Democrats and voted tactically to GTTO as they only can defeat the Conservatives here not Labour who I’d always voted for previously.
    I went on marches in 2016 and before 2017 and 2019 Brexit decisions for Remain and exit from Brexit refinding my campaigning spirit from the 80’s campaigning for Peace/CND/an end to apartheid/support for PLO.
    I loved the freedom I had to work in EU and was only disappointed in that my years in EU paying taxes there didn’t count towards a pension in UK as I’d imagined before setting off for a decade of EU working.
    Luckily my daughter was christened in Greece and so both my husband and daughter have greek ID cards and can still travel freely unlike myself.

    I am so pleased this film got made it speaks to so many’s experiences and it was nostalgic to remember the boom weekends when as a teen I baby sat for returning trawlermen and made money for another months fun discos/sci fi novels/sweets till the next catch came in..
    A happy village life with freedom to rome leading to a funded Uni place and EU travelling and work for a decade..

    A far cry from broken Britain after austerity and Brexit that faces my daughter now finished with Uni and paying off debts from four years in Exeter… doing little local jobs as no Astrophysics ones yet…

    I would rejoin the EU in a heartbeat
    and may swap Britain for France in retirement if we don’t do that in time…
    But for now disabled by long covid for four years just getting back to my 20 year career in Hydrology, geochemistry lab work and applications engineer work would be nice…
    We need to rejoin the EU clean up our rivers and indoor air and renationalise utilities when we have gotten PR and rid of the Tories.
    Thank you for a thought provoking and truthful look at Brexit lies and reality.

  2. Christopher Kelly says:

    It’s a very good documentary but I don’t think it really explains the “deep, long term factors that led to Brexit”. The Euro-sceptics had been around since early 90s if not before. The Tories were even offering a referendum on EU membership in their 2005 manifesto. UKIP was around too, but getting nowhere electorally until seismic 2014 European Election result. How did that happen? How did they go from (2006) “fruitcakes and loonies” to winning majority of MEPs and changing the Tory party forever in the process? Crazy. In my view, the real long term factors were:
    1. right-wing media especially tabloids persistently hostile to EU and the ‘freedoms’
    2. complete lack of positive messaging about the EU, ever.
    As to why that anti-EU stance came to appeal to so many Brits (who now feel betrayed):
    3. widespread ignorance about structure and functioning of EU.
    4. widespread ignorance and naivety about politics and the machinations.
    5. underlying chauvinistic arrogance and xenophobia.

  3. J A Holt says:

    I agree wholeheartedly with the above comment. But I, too, have a quibble. Peter Oborne at 47’52” states: “he (Johnson) started to fall in with the most dreadful people,” but gives no clue to whom he is referring. Considering the loathsome creature Johnson became during his premiership, this seems to me to beg the question. In the absence of names, my guess is those he met at Lebedev’s Italian villa in April, 2018; the secrecy and mystery around that visit remain intact today. What horrors did Johnson face?
    If my guess is wrong, I have to assume Mr Oborne is referring to the ‘usual suspects’ at the time of brexit. Yes, I suppose they were dreadful enough.

  4. Anamaria Wills says:

    I think this is a brilliant film, absolutely illustrating and explaining why I, as a Remainer, feel as I do – and, in watching it, I began to empathise with the people who voted Leave – a situation I’d have said was impossible to empathise with! At the beginning, I was almost embarrassed to say the reason I want to Remain is because I am a European. I love that I have European heritage, that Moliere and Racine enrich me as much as Shakespeare (well, almost!) and Austen; that the glory that is Siena is as much mine as vitality of Liverpool or the inspiration of Oxford – that the breadth of vision that is Europe informs my thinking more completely than the UK alone. I miss it and I hurt, even 7 years later –
    So yes, it was terrific in showing the different types of damage and hurt and hopeful in ending with a sense that maybe things could change again – Bravo!
    My only quibble is that your very last sentences felt wrong, inadequate to what you’d taken on – it was a bit too vague, too ‘pie in the sky’ – What were you aiming for? It must be more than a history lesson, mustn’t it?

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